AARP wants seniors to have a say on Social Security and Medicare

by | May 1, 2012

The senior advocacy group, AARP, is planning a nationwide campaign called “You’ve Earned a Say.”

To launch the yearlong initiative, AARP is gathering small groups in all 50 states to distill a consensus about managing the challenges facing Social Security and Medicare. AARP will leverage the sheer numbers of Americans age 50 and above to “have a say” in how Congress handles the programs.

AARP plans to survey congressional candidates and post their responses before the Nov. 6 election.

“We think it’s absolutely critical that we start a national conversation about these programs,” said Rich Steven, a volunteer at AARP’s office in Peoria.

The initial phase of the effort is to discuss the challenges facing the national programs, Steven said. In the summer, AARP will start discussing solutions for looming problems — a lack of new workers to support aging Boomers, rising health-care costs, longer predicted lifespans and a projected shortfall for Social Security and Medicare.

Medicare, a national health insurance program that kicks in when Americans turn 65, is facing the same financial pressures as Social Security, according to AARP figures.

The senior advocacy group, AARP, is planning a nationwide campaign called “You’ve Earned a Say.”

To launch the yearlong initiative, AARP is gathering small groups in all 50 states to distill a consensus about managing the challenges facing Social Security and Medicare. AARP will leverage the sheer numbers of Americans age 50 and above to “have a say” in how Congress handles the programs.

AARP plans to survey congressional candidates and post their responses before the Nov. 6 election.

“We think it’s absolutely critical that we start a national conversation about these programs,” said Rich Steven, a volunteer at AARP’s office in Peoria.

The initial phase of the effort is to discuss the challenges facing the national programs, Steven said. In the summer, AARP will start discussing solutions for looming problems — a lack of new workers to support aging Boomers, rising health-care costs, longer predicted lifespans and a projected shortfall for Social Security and Medicare.

Medicare, a national health insurance program that kicks in when Americans turn 65, is facing the same financial pressures as Social Security, according to AARP figures.

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